Stand Up in Drag

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Stand Up in Drag

Join us at STAND UP IN DRAG tonight at 8pm!

A night of drag and all proceeds go to Stand Up Placer! They do great things, and help people in need. Want to learn more? You can!

It just so happens the incredible organizer of tonight’s Stand Up for Drag, Kyle Ketsdever, answered some questions.

Read, enjoy, and we’ll see you tonight!

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Improv and Hiking, It’s Not Just for Adults Without Driver’s Licenses

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Improv and Hiking, It’s Not Just for Adults Without Driver’s Licenses

“The first thing you realize when you go hiking is that it’s a mistake. We’re not walking anywhere in particular. There’s not at the end of the trail, a bar or pub or cheese fries, it’s just walking”. Jim Gaffigan, the comedian most famous for his laziness and food jokes, has turned to an anti-hiking mantra – “I’m an adult, I have a driver’s license”. But what if you’re on a date and she suggests going for a hike? Well here’s how you can combine your love of comedy with your date’s love for the great outdoors.

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What's It's Like To Be In Love . . . With Improv

Today's guest blogger is Meggan Johnson Hyde. Meggan is a Sacramento improviser and main-stage performer at Blacktop Comedy. You can see Meggan in Your F@#$%! Up Relationship, Squeaky Clean: Family Friendly Comedy, and the upcoming Teen Slasher

I remember the first time I met you, Improv. It truly was love at first sight. While I'm typically somewhat of a wallflower when I'm surrounded by unfamiliar faces, you were so warm and welcoming that I found myself jumping right into the conversation.
"Hi! My name is Meggan, and I like to do this!"


I flirted with you during some warm-up games, casually noticing how everyone around you was having such a great time. But then, you took to the stage and that's when I knew my life would never be the same. You had the cool factor of the jock with the accessibility of the student council president. I sat back and watched you in action for a while, completely in awe of how supportive and encouraging you were. Finally, though my heart was racing, I shot my shaky hand up in the air and asked to join you onstage. Suddenly, there we were. Together. Laughing and having the best time of our lives. It all came together so easily. I was in love, and I wanted to shout it from the mountain tops!
I found myself wanting to be with you all the time. I never missed an opportunity to be with you onstage. I took all the classes and workshops that I could, so as to get to know you better. I read books and listened to podcasts by people who had known you for decades. The more I learned about you, the more I found wonderful and new aspects about you to be discovered. Over the next few months I did everything I could to fill my brain with all the knowledge about you that would fit.


That's when it happened. Everything had seemed so easy in the beginning. Every time we were together we would laugh and play, and it had all seemed so effortless. But suddenly, things were . . . awkward. Now, any time we got together all I could think about was every single thing I was doing wrong. I could barely even talk to you anymore. Standing onstage together, I was completely frozen.


That was a defining moment for us. It would have been so easy for me to walk away, right then and there - to write you off as being too complicated and just call it quits. But I couldn't let you go. I confided in a good friend/mentor, one who had known you for a very long time. He told me that what I was going through was totally normal. In fact, it happens a lot. He called it a valley, and he encouraged me to keep trudging through it. Because eventually, I'd find myself at the top of another mountain with you. My friend also warned me that there would be other valleys. And he was right. Because every good relationship has mountains and valleys. And you, my Beloved Improv, are worth every one.

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Stop Being Polite

Today's guest blogger is Garrett Bank. Garrett is a Sacramento improviser and main-stage performer at Blacktop Comedy. His past performances include KAPOW, Teen Slasher, and F@#$%! Up Relationship.

In my short time studying improv there is always the inevitable conversation, “Hey why did you sit on the side the whole show?” And this always leads to an inevitable answer, “I felt like I was hopping out too much. I wanted someone else to have a turn.” While this might not always be the answer, at one point or another someone you are on a team with is going to say something along the lines of, “I was just making sure everyone gets a turn.” This is where the epidemic of politeness in improv spawns.

Now making sure everyone gets to play and have fun during a show is a noble effort but has a lot of flawed logic. Say you come up with a scene start idea while on the sidelines and you are about to run on and start the greatest improv scene of your career. When suddenly you remember you were in the last three scenes and the person next to you hasn’t been in any. So you put that idea aside and what for your fellow improviser to hop in. My advice to the reader who has ever had this thought while on stage; GET OFF THE SIDELINES AND START THAT SCENE! If you do, not only do you create a scene that people (who possibly haven’t hopped out yet) can join in on but you have put aside self judgment and acted on instinct. I understand you want to be nice to your fellow improvisers but not participating because someone else is not participating just creates two people not participating. Also, when did improv become a game where we kept score? Do we go backstage and count up how many scenes we were in and flaunt in front of everyone? Let me give you the quick answer: No. We get out on stage a lot because we want to play or we want to support what our other improvisers are trying to create. Improv is truly one of the only team based sports that is not about competition.

Now if you are still concerned about the person on the sideline who still won’t hop into a scene, when you get that next scene start invite them out with you. Everybody wins! You no longer have to feel bad about playing a lot (but you shouldn’t anyway). In summary, the intention of being polite is a great idea but ultimately can be self-destructive to you and your fellow team mates. Play and join scenes as much as you want and have a great time.

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